App Compatibility


#1

So with 10.3 my phone has started telling me about the apps that won’t work in the future… For me, there is a decent list. Most of them won’t be a loss and are only there because I’ve never bothered removing them. Qouch is about the only one actively use, I’m sure there are other virtual mouse apps… the rest are older titles which I play with when I’m bored and have 5 minutes free.

So how many apps do others have that will die soon?


Tuesday Morning News
#2

I have a lot of apps on my iPhone (lots of games for my daughter).

Looking at my list, I have 136 apps which are going to lose compatability. There are probably 20 of those apps which I use regularly, and losing them will be a pain. I have already started to look for alternatives as those apps are not going to be updated.

What does annoy me is that some developers have taken this as an opportunity to launch a new app (rather than update the existing app), which means that I need to re-purchase the app again. One app I paid $12.99 for about 2 years ago. The app has been re-launched as a “new” app with a purchase price of $12.99. Looking at the app, it is exactly the same application (except updated). There is no discount or bundling offered either which allows existing app owners to re-purchase the app at a discount. - Disappointed.

There are a few games which I play regularly too which have not been updated. Not sure they will ever get updated which is a shame as they are still fun to play.

Why is Apple allowing apps which are going to cease working soon to be still available to purchase on the App Store? There was an app I purchased (Harry Potter Spells) just at Christmas for my daughter which is on the list of apps which are going to stop working. Whilst I have only spent about $5 (including unlocking of an in-app purchase), it is not likely to be updated as the last update was in 2014. It’s not a small developer either (Warner Bros) and a prominent brand, but I don’t think they are going to spend money updating the app.


#3

Where do I find this list?

EDIT: Found it, but do I assume that if I can’t actually get to a list within Settings > General > About > Applications (i.e. I tap on applications and nothing happens it just shows me how many apps are installed), that means I don’t have any that are of concern?


#4

Yup. I just tested installing an older app. Definitely seems to be the case.

The only thing that makes me really sad about this is now The Secret Of Monkey Island (my most favouritest game ever) will be no longer playable on iPhone ever again.


#5

Can’t Apple just work out a way to keep these running? Aren’t iOS apps sandboxed to the point that one app shouldn’t have an effect on the system as a whole?

Seems very arbitrary to me. By all means prevent any new Apps being made that are 32bit only but this seems too much to me.


#6

Some kind of emulator mode for legacy apps might come out. I mean there will be millions of older folk who will get caught out by this. My mum was well pissed with me when I upgraded her iPad and an app she loved was no longer available…


#7

I’m unsure why there needs to be an emulator mode when it is currently supported fine?

From my understanding, iOS 10.3.2 is going to prevent these apps from running - sounds to be like they’re going to flip a switch and stop them running. Why do they nee to do this?


#8

Rumours are iOS 11 will drop support for 32 bit apps. What you’ve probably heard is there’s currently no 10.3.2 beta for 32 bit devices (iPad 4, iPhone 5/5C and below), this might change in the future.

This has been in the works for a while. The 5S was the first iPhone with a 64 bit processor, and in 2015, Apple said that all new and updated apps must be 64 bit. Developers have had around 2 years for this change. The onus is on them to update their apps.

This change (in iOS 11) should dramatically increased performance and reduce the file size of future versions of iOS (since there’ll only be 64 bit binaries to support in the future).

All Apple’s done wrong here is not being proactive enough in removing old/abandoned apps from the App Store.

Also, if you’ve purchased 32 bit only apps recently Apple will issue a refund on them for up to 3 months (via the report a problem link).

This change is similar (albeit a different realm) to Apple dropping Power PC support in Snow Leopard.

Also, an emulator is a terrible solution to the problem. The correct solution is for developers to update their apps to be 64 bit.


#9

Thus why they will never be the ‘environmentally caring’ company they claim they are. Recycling some old iPhones is not the same as ensuring that their devices don’t have arbitrary usability cut offs. Not arbitrarily cutting off software support isn’t extending longevity for the hell of it, more like doing what should be a basic requirement in a world where we need to be extending the useful lifespan of things.

I’ve read both. Possibly sources are confused.

Again, that is an ideal world, reality means it is not gonna happen so the consumer looses out. It is on Apple, it is Apple’s choice to not offer a workaround. Is it a developer’s fault if they go out of business due to uncontrollable factors? It is Apple’s choice to drop support and I would blame Apple given they’re the massive corporation with the truckloads of cash and resources who can actually make the difference here.

Then we’d be in exactly the same position we’re in today. Apple has done its best to ensure that certain Apps continue to run for people to continue using if they needed it.


#10

I disagree completely here. It’s up to the developer to offer support for and to update their app. Not Apple. If the developer can no longer support their app, then dem’s da brakes. Plenty of abandoned apps stop working with each major iOS update. Only difference here is this will be a big cut and we know about it ahead of time. If a consumer loses out, that’s on the developer, not on Apple. I say that as someone who’s lost at least one game, and is about to lose at least two more of his favourite games to this change.

If Apple released an emulator (or allowed third party emulators) and they have done everything correctly, and a handful of apps for a variety of inconsistent reasons don’t run as expected on their emulator, who is the onus on to fix it? Apple, the emulator developer, or the original app developer?

My mentality as a hard and fast rule is if an app’s no longer supported by the developer, it’s dead, or at the very least, it is understood to be as it is and may stop working for any reason whatsoever at any point in time.


#11

[quote=“Oldmacs, post:9, topic:3273”]Thus why they will never be the ‘environmentally caring’ company they claim they are. Recycling some old iPhones is not the same as ensuring that their devices don’t have arbitrary usability cut offs. Not arbitrarily cutting off software support isn’t extending longevity for the hell of it, more like doing what should be a basic requirement in a world where we need to be extending the useful lifespan of things. [/QUOTE]

They’re not arbitrarily cutting off software support. There’s very good technical reasons why this needs to happen. The devices affected by it are 4-5 years old now. They’re well and truly past the expected lifespan of the technology.

Using this to fuel the “Apple doesn’t care about the environment” case is a bullshit argument.

[QUOTE]Again, that is an ideal world, reality means it is not gonna happen so the consumer looses out. It is on Apple, it is Apple’s choice to not offer a workaround. Is it a developer’s fault if they go out of business due to uncontrollable factors? It is Apple’s choice to drop support and I would blame Apple given they’re the massive corporation with the truckloads of cash and resources who can actually make the difference here. [/QUOTE]

We don’t live in an ideal world. This is the world we live in.

Apple have provided the tools for developers to solve this problem. Apple’s cashflow and resources are hugely irrelevant to this situation.

These factors are perfectly controllable. Apple has warned in advance that this day is coming, the signs that this would one day happen have been around since the iPhone 5S to anyone with any technical knowledge, and Apple provides up to date resources and documentation for developers to keep their apps up to do date.

It is Apple’s choice but it’s a necessary choice to advance their platform. And if not now, then when?

Exactly. And that’s why emulators and other similar workarounds are a terrible solution to this problem.

If a Chrome or Internet Explorer update breaks my company’s website, I have to update my website. I can’t then call up Google or Microsoft and tell them to rollback the changes to fix it.


#12

I call bullshit on your argument. They’re only “past it” if you’re more interested in Apple’s profits over everything else. It’s a basic principle that the longer you can extend the lifespan of anything the better it is for the environment. There is no “Very good reason” for this to happen, unless iOS 11 is packed with so many features that there is no possible way to run it - they currently run iOS 10 very well . We’re talking device still being sold under 2 years ago worldwide, and the 5C in India less than a Year ago. Apple don’t give a damn about the environment, beyond the greenwashing they do in areas where it is cost effective.

Yeah thats the point, we don’t live in an ideal world. I again don’t see how it is consumer’s fault if their app developer of the app they want to keep using is not updated. They are the ones that loose out.

Different scenario. How is being in a similar situation to today a “terrible solution”? Having the app that people want to use works today and being able to continue in that mode is not a terrible solution. Many people are happy with the app that they have now and it works fine so that is far from a terrible solution.


#13

I don’t really care enough to keep rehashing the same argument dude.

You’re so far off the mark with this one it’s not funny.


#14

Yeah in your opinion I am. Not everyone shares your (Or my) opinion.


#15

I agree with Angus on this one. At some point you always have to cut off support for the lowest common denominator. Some will always say this a bad thing but I think the historical examples of this approach being a positive are well understood by now. I’m not inviting a response to this as like Angus I’m not interested in debating, it’s just my view in response to the views posted above.


#16

Have to agree with Angus as well. Oldmacs, you keep rehashing the same old argument and this thread is way off topic now.


#17

You guys rehash the same responce so I don’t see a problem.


#18

I just think it is an unfortunate situation for people who have invested themselves in particular apps. It is these people who will loose out. Doesn’t personally have any bearing on me, but I can just bet I’ll have to deal with it with the users I support.


#19

I do agree with your earlier post though, Apple should’ve pulled 32 bit apps long ago. My general rule of thumb is if there’s any signs that the apps not built on a current SDK (even if it has the larger, blown up keyboard) I’m getting an instant refund and finding a competing app.


#20

For the purposes of this thread, my unsupported apps.