Apple Care+ for Mac


#1

Looks like Apple care+ for mac can be added in Aus now. As it includes accidental damages seems worthwhile adding to a mac portable, not so sure about an iMac?
Apple Care+


Friday Morning News
#2

Nice. I’m guessing no-one has been buying the old normal AppleCare anymore given 3yr protection under ACL (Australian Consumer Law) so they’ve finally turned it into actual insurance. Makes it a far more reasonable proposition now!


#3

I bought regular AppleCare in 2015 for my (2015 Made) 2012 MBP. It actually turned out to be a great decision because it was bought in New Mexico. I’ve had two chargers, a couple of keyboard keys, and a battery replaced. I’m going to go in soon (it ends in March of 2018), because my black plastic hinge cover has cracked. It really shouldn’t have, the rest of the MBP is spotless.

But if the US had the same protection as Straya does, I wouldn’t have needed it, probably. ACL would have covered it.


#4

Good news, but I’d still have to think long and hard about buying it with a new Mac.

AppleCare+ is a great proposition on iPhones because they’re always with you and can get accidentally damaged in so many more ways as a result; dropped, exposed to liquid (less so now that they’re somewhat water resistant), impact damaged, etc.

Statistically speaking, there’s just less ways you can damage a Mac — especially desktop Macs — in ways that won’t be covered by warranty. Sure, accidents happen, and there’s a chance you could have your iMac Pro angled in such a way so a cup of water can enter it and totally kill it, or your kid could kick a soccer ball into it and make it crash to the ground, but in those circumstances I’d hope that you have home and contents insurance.

Then again, it’s not particularly expensive vs total cost of a new Mac. Hmm. Like I said, I’d have to think long and hard about it.


#5

I’d see it as more useful with portable Mac where the “opportunities” for accidental damage are higher


#6

We’re finding more and more insurers aren’t covering the full market value of a Mac, particularly laptops where the replacement cost can be $4000+, while some policies are capped at $2000-$2500. AppleCare+ will at least cover the cost of repairs, no matter how expensive, within the first three years. A better insurance policy is still a better option since it covers damage outside of the three years, and covers replacement of the machine rather than just repairs. However some may be enticed by the one-off upfront fee, faster turnaround and not having to deal with the back and forth with an insurer when the time comes to make a claim.

It’ll be interesting in education as well, where most schools purchase 3-year AppleCare Protection Plans with new machines despite the ACL covering them already. They’ll now be covered for accidental damage to the machines, and it’ll probably result in a lot less write-offs. (Although as Apple thins out the suitable and reasonably priced product lines I suspect we’ll start to see less Macs in upper primary and secondary education anyway.)


#7

I’m shocked schools are touching Macs these days. Well, private schools maybe.


#8

My experience is that education orders started to decline when the 11" MacBook Air and 13" MacBook Pro (MD101) were discontinued. Some schools (mainly private) switched across to the 13" MacBook Air as a replacement, but with rumours circulating that it’s likely to be discontinued, I suspect they’ll look elsewhere when the orders for next year are due. The 12" MacBook isn’t durable or versatile enough, and even the base configuration MacBook Pro is too expensive.

Of course Apple wants to push iPad and iPad Pro into education, but unless other suppliers have different figures, they don’t seem to be moving in the same volumes. They’re suitable for reading and situations where managed devices are beneficial, but they’re still expensive yet relatively fragile in the hands of primary students, and I can’t imagine ideal in senior secondary levels where a lot of typing is involved.


#9

I think that’s because AppleCare qualifies for onsite service doesn’t it?


#10

Definitely. I have so many clients who have written off expensive laptops thanks to kids accidentally damaging them (inadvertently standing or sitting on closed laptops smashing screens, spilling water, dropping laptops/iPads etc.)


#11

I’m a JHS teacher, and I would concur that iPads literally are the worst of both worlds. Too fragile for younger students, not “normal” enough for use for older students. MacBook Airs are an acceptable compromise. Fairly inexpensive, and a good introduction to the MacOS environment and it certainly allows JHS/HS students to investigate video editing, graphic design, etc. with the typical industry standards, which includes Apple’s own.

I know my own HS started with NT Machines for video editing using Premie 5.1c-6.5, which is why I still use Premiere today. About three years after I graduated, they switched to iMacs, and I believe they still use Macs today. I need to find out, actually.